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BATMAN (1940-2011) #400
VF+: 8.5
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PUBLISHER: DC
COMMENTS: white pgs
Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
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DESCRIPTION
white pgs
Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
2-page introduction by Stephen King. As Batman ponders the note 'Know Your Foes' sent to him as a warning, all of his foes are sprung from Arkham Asylum in "Resurrection Night!" Script by Doug Moench. Art by John Byrne (1 page), Steve Lightle & Bruce D. Patterson (6 pages), George Perez (4 pages), Paris Cullins & Larry Mahlstedt (3 pages), Bill Sienkiewicz (7 pages), Arthur Adams & Terry Austin (8 pages), Tom Sutton & Ricardo Villagran (6 pages), Steve Leialoha (3 pages), Joe Kubert (4 pages), Ken Steacy (3 pages), Rick Leonardi & Karl Kesel (6 pages), Brian Bolland (9 pages). Plus: pin-ups by Mike Grell, Michael W. Kaluta, Bernie Wrightson, Steve Rude. Cover by Bill Sienkiewicz.


Artists Information

Joe Kubert (Sept. 18, 1926 - Aug. 12, 2012) began his career at the age of 13. He was also an art teacher and founder of The Kubert School. He is best known for his work on the characters like Sgt. Rock, Hawkman, Tor, Son of Sinbad and the Viking Prince.

Starting out as an amateur, a meeting with Frank Frazetta at a comic convention in 1967 inspired Bernie Wrightson to pursue his dream of becoming a comic book artist, he began working for DC after contributing work samples to Dick Giordano, in the Silver Age he would illustrate short stories in horror anthologies, in one of those tales he invented the Swamp Thing, who would be granted his own title, which Bernie drew the first ten issues of, then he moved over to Warren, known for their macabre content, and grew his fan base, at one point he was living in the same building as Al Milgrom, Howard Chaykin and Walt Simonson. He left comics to form an artist's collective known as 'The Studio' where he would concentrate on posters and lithographs, portfolios and the like, his adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is commonly regarded as his finest achievement. His pen and ink and brush work on this black and white collection is elegant and emotionally resonant. He also collaborated with Stephen King on adapting his work like Creepshow. In later years he did spot work on comics, while continuing his poster work, notably illustrating the popular Batman: The Cult series. He passed away in 2017 after a long battle with brain cancer.

Terry Kevin Austin is an American comic book artist who is best known for his exceptional inking talents. Austin’s inking — especially in the period of the 1970s and early 1980s — is notable for its smooth, precise rendering; and extremely detailed backgrounds, making his embellishing work easily identifiable. His style has been highly influential on a subsequent generation of inkers including Al Gordon, Andy Lanning, Scott Williams and Rob Liefeld. Austin grew up in Detroit, Michigan and attended Wayne State University. He started inking comics as an assistant to Dick Giordano and Neal Adams, doing “Crusty Bunker” work for Adams’ Continuity Associates. Austin came to prominence in 1976–1977, inking Marshall Rogers’ pencils on a celebrated run of Batman stories for DC Comics’ Detective Comics collaborating with writer Steve Englehart. During this same period, Austin inked Michael Netzer (Nasser) on DC’s Martian Manhunter in Adventure Comics and Green Arrow/Black Canary in World’s Finest Comics, as well as Al Milgrom on Marvel Comics’ Captain Marvel. He later teamed with Rogers again on Marvel’s Doctor Strange. X-Men In 1977, Austin and penciler John Byrne became the new art team on Uncanny X-Men. With writer Chris Claremont they produced a series of stories — particularly “The Dark Phoenix Saga” — which elevated the title into the top-selling American comic book. Post X-Men Austin left Uncanny X-Men in 1981 and has since worked on a variety of titles for both Marvel & DC, including Doctor Strange (over Paul Smith and Dan Green pencils), Superman vol. 2 (over Byrne), Justice League (over Kevin Maguire) and Green Lantern (over Darryl Banks). Austin contributed to several anniversary issues for DC including Justice League of America #200 (March 1982), Superman #400 (Oct. 1984) and Batman #400 (Oct. 1986). He was the regular inker of DC’s Superman Adventures for nearly six years, from 1996–2002. His inking work since 2002 has included over fifteen years of inking the Sonic the Hedgehog comic book series for Archie Comics, which he continued until the series cancellation in 2017.

George Pérez was an American comic book artist and writer whose titles include The Avengers, Teen Titans, and Wonder Woman. Notable works include: Deadly Hands of Kung-Fu, Creatures on the Loose, Action Comics and Crisis on Infinite Earths. Perez would achieve his first taste of success during a memorable run on Marvel's The Avengers in the 1970's, developing a style that would define him for his decades long career. In the 1980's Perez would go over to DC where he would launch the hugely successful New Teen Titans with writer Marv Wolfman, the title was so popular it would crossover with Marvel's X-Men. When DC needed an artist for it's company re-defining event series Crisis on Infinite Earth's Perez was the obvious choice, with his ability to effortlessly draw dozens of different characters at once. Perez would also have his hand in a successful reboot of Wonder Woman in the late 1980's. In the early 90's he would work with Jim Starlin on his Thanos saga, drawing the bulk of the Infinity Gauntlet mini-series. That was followed by a triumphant return to The Avengers and a JLA/Avengers crossover. Perez would draw hundreds more comics featuring nearly every Marvel and DC character before health issues forced his retirement in 2018.

John Byrne is one of the most storied creators in the history of comics. Beginning his career at Charlton he quickly moved over to Marvel Comics where he established himself early on as a workhorse and fan favorite, he would draw early appearances of Iron Fist before landing the gig working with Chris Claremont on X-Men. Claremont and Byrne would create several of the most memorable storylines in the history of the X-Men, their Dark Phoenix Saga and Days of Future Past stories have been adapted into three feature films. Byrne would convince Claremont to not kill Wolverine, proving to be one of the most lucrative decisions in Marvel's history, he would also introduce Kitty Pryde and Alpha Flight during this time. After his work on X-Men, Byrne would have a short run on The Avengers before launching his second classic comic run, this time on Marvel's first family The Fantastic Four, writing and drawing the title for five years. Byrne would leave Marvel for DC in the mid 1980s where he was tasked with revamping their flagship Superman titles, he would draw two Superman titles a month while writing a third. After two years at DC, Byrne returned to Marvel where he would create memorable stints on She-Hulk, Namor The Sub-Mariner, and Iron Man. In the 90's Byrne would work on several creator owner titles at Dark Horse, including his Next Men (which would introduce Mike Mignola's Hellboy), Babe and Danger Unlimited. In the years that followed Byrne would create many more books, often working on titles that inspired him as a boy including a revamp of Jack Kirby's Fourth World and DC's Doom Patrol and The Demon.

Known for his high level of detail, this Bronze Age comic artist working for Marvel and then helping to create the creator-owned comic publisher Legend, has been inspiration for many modern artists.

Larry Mahlstedt is a professional comic book inker and illustrator. He started his career in the early 80s working for DC Comics on titles like Adventure Comics, Unexpected, Weird War Tales, Green Lantern, Batman and many others. Larry moved to Marvel Comics in the early 90's and worked on some of their most notable titles including "Amazing Spider-Man".

British comic artist known for being a definitive artist for Judge Dredd and spearheading the 'British Invasion' in the American comics industry

Bill Sienkiewicz is an American artist, known for his work in comic books—particularly for Marvel Comics’ New Mutants, Moon Knight, and Elektra: Assassin. Sienkiewicz’s work in the 1980s was considered revolutionary in mainstream U.S. comics due to his highly stylized art that verged on abstraction and made use of oil painting, photorealism, collage, mimeograph, and other forms generally uncommon in comic books. Sienkiewicz was born May 3, 1958, in Blakely, Pennsylvania. When he was five years old, he moved with his family to the Hainesville, New Jersey section of Sandyston Township, New Jersey, where he attended elementary and secondary school. Sienkiewicz began drawing “when he was about four or five” and continued doing and learning about art throughout his childhood. His early comic book influences include artist Curt Swan Superman comics, and artist Jack Kirby’s Fantastic Four. Sienkiewicz received his classical art education at the Newark School of Fine and Industrial Arts in Newark, New Jersey. After art school, he showed a portfolio of his work to DC Comics’ art director Vince Colletta, which led to his entering the comics field at age 19. The artist recalled in 1985; “They didn’t have any work for me, but that didn’t bother me. I just figured that if comics didn’t work out I’d have done advertising or illustration. Vinnie called [renowned comics and advertising artist] Neal Adams, who put me in touch with [Marvel Comics editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. Soon after that I was drawing Moon Knight, in The Hulk [black-and-white comics] magazine.” His early art style was heavily influenced by Neal Adams. Sienkiewicz continued as the artist of the Moon Knight color comics series, starting with the first issue (November 1980). His eclectic art style helped shed the early perception of Moon Knight as a mere Batman clone. Four years later, after a stint as artist on the Fantastic Four, he became the artist on Marvel’s X-Men spin-off New Mutants, beginning with issue No. 18 (August 1984), producing cover paintings and character designs. From this period on, Sienkiewicz’s art evolved into a much more expressionistic style, and he began experimenting with paint, collage and mixed media. He illustrated New Mutants from 1984 to 1985. Sienkiewicz produced covers for a range of Marvel titles, including Rom, Dazzler, The Mighty Thor, Return of the Jedi and The Transformers. He also created the comic adaptation of Dune. Sienkiewicz’s own first writing credit was for the painted story “Slow Dancer” in Epic Illustrated in 1986. Sienkiewicz both wrote and illustrated the 1988 miniseries Stray Toasters, an idiosyncratic work published by Epic Comics about a criminal psychologist investigating a series of murders. His first major interior work for DC Comics was contributing to Batman #400 (October 1986). He illustrated the 1986-87 eight-issue Elektra: Assassin limited series and the Daredevil: Love and War graphic novel which were both written by Frank Miller.

Bruce Patterson is an American comic book artist who began working for DC comics as an inker and letterer for Marvel in the late 70s. Over the next two decades, he continued his work with the two major publishing houses as an inker/letterer and sometimes penciler, occasionally doing cover art. Bruce's most notable works include Action Comics and the Invincible Iron Man.

Tom Sutton was an American comic book artist who's best known for his work with Marvel comics and Warren Publishing. Tom's most notable works include Famous Monsters of Filmland, Creepy, and Marvel comics presents featuring the muck-monster Man-Thing.


  • description
    BATMAN (1940-2011) #400
    DC NM-: 9.2
    ow/white pgs
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    ow/white pgs
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    Buy Confirmation
    You are about to buy this item for , and will be legally obligated under the terms of our User Agreement to pay for it in a timely fashion. Continue?
    Offer Confirmation
    You are about to submit an offer of . If accepted, you are legally obligated to purchase the book. Are you sure you want to continue?
  • description
    BATMAN (1940-2011) #400
    DC VF/NM: 9.0
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    Buy Confirmation
    You are about to buy this item for , and will be legally obligated under the terms of our User Agreement to pay for it in a timely fashion. Continue?
    Offer Confirmation
    You are about to submit an offer of . If accepted, you are legally obligated to purchase the book. Are you sure you want to continue?
  • description
    BATMAN (1940-2011) #400
    DC VF: 8.0
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    Sienkiewicz cover/art; Byrne, Kaluta, Kubert, Perez, Wrightson art; anniversary issue
    Buy Confirmation
    You are about to buy this item for , and will be legally obligated under the terms of our User Agreement to pay for it in a timely fashion. Continue?
    Offer Confirmation
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